History

1956


The original Brushy Creek Water Control and Improvement District (WCID) No. 1 of Williamson and Milam Counties is established, responsible for 46 floodwater retarding structures.


1972


Congress passes the Dam Inspection Act authorizing the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to review all federal and state dam safety programs and regulations and to inspect all high- hazard dams.
Dam 3 construction

1986


Texas tightens its dam safety regulations to adhere to the Corps of Engineers’ criteria requiring high hazard dams to safely pass 100% of the Probable Maximum Flood.
A gavel resting on an American flag.

June 1998


Regional dam owners’ lack of financial resources spurs state recommendation of a flexible cafeteria plan of dam safety regulations to economically address dam safety problems.
A broken piggy-bank.

November 2001


Voters of Williamson and Milam Counties approve splitting the original WCID into two new water districts in the upper and lower Brushy Creek watersheds, officially known as No. 1A and No. 2B.
Dam 7

May 2002


Voters in the new Upper Brushy Creek WCID (No. 1A) approve an ad valorem tax of a maximum of two cents per $100 of property evaluation to finance the dam modernization program. Also, due to the cost of raising all dams to 100% PMF, the District applies to the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ) for a variance to the state's dam safety regulations.
A band-aid holding together a torn page in a book.

May 2003


TCEQ approves WCID's implementation of the cafeteria plan as a variance. District can now raise dams to 50% PMF with conditions that include the installation of a flood monitoring system.
Two men shaking hands.

August 2003


Construction begins on the WCID's first dam modernization project at Dam No. 9.
A busy construction site.

January 2004


Modernization of Dam No. 9 completed - it is raised to safely pass 100% of the PMF.
Aerial view of an interstate near a body of water.

Summer 2005


Installation of Phase I of Flood Monitoring System is completed. Modernization of Dams 11, 12 and 14 is completed. Dams 11 and 12 are raised to safely pass 100% of the PMF; Dam 14 is raised to safely pass 50% of the PMF.
A metal rod protruding from a body of water near the shoreline.

2006


Installation of Phase II of the Flood Monitoring System is completed. Modernization of Dams 1, 6, and 13A is completed. Dams 1 and 6 are raised to safely pass 50% of the PMF. Dam 13A is raised to safely pass 100% of the PMF with a rehabilitation grant from the Natural Resources Conservation Service.
A dirt road stretching through the countryside.

2007


TCEQ adopted the new Hydrologic and Hydraulic Guidelines for Dams in Texas - guidelines that make it economically feasible to raise most, if not all, dams to 100% PMF. Modernization of Dams 15 and 20 is completed; they are raised to safely pass 100% of the PMF. Phase III of the installation of the Flood Monitoring System is completed.
Cover sheet of a document titled, "Hydrologic and Hydraulic Guidelines for Dams in Texas."

September 2007


The District is awarded the West Region Award of Merit for outstanding contributions to dam safety on a regional level by the Association of State Dam Safety Officials.
A group of people posing together with a plaque.

2008


Modernization of Dams 1, 6, 17, 19 is completed; they are raised to safely pass 100% of the PMF.
Aerial view of a body of water near a highway.

2009


TCEQ published updated dam safety rules. Modernization of Dams 2, 5, and 16 completed; they are raised to safely pass 100% of the PMF.
A construction project in action.

2010


Modernization of Dams 2, 3, 4, and 14 were completed; they are raised to safely pass 100% of the PMF.

A large truck driving down a dirt road.

2011


Modernization of Dams 18, 21, and 22 were completed; they are raised to safely pass 100% of the PMF.

Dam 18 construction

2011


The District received a grant from the Texas Water Development Board for the Upper Brushy Creek Watershed Study and Flood Protection Plan following severe flooding in the watershed from Tropical Storm Hermine in September 2010.  The District enlisted the participation of a Technical Advisory Committee comprised of the floodplain administrators for all of the communities within the District.

Dam 7

2012


The District received a grant from FEMA through the Texas Water Development Board to incorporate the Watershed Study data into a Risk Map Flood Study for use in the development of new floodplain maps for the watershed.  The public was invited to participate in the process.

Public Meeting

2013


The District entered into an agreement with the U.S. Geological Survey to install and maintain rainfall and reservoir level gages at the District dams and stream gages on Brushy Creek and Lake Creek.  This network of gages replaced the original flood monitoring system that was installed in 2005-2006.  Final design, easement acquisition, and permitting begins for Dam #7 Modernization.

USGS Gage

2014


The District entered into an Interlocal Agreement with City of Round Rock to pursue the design and construction of Dams #101 and #102 in the Lake Creek Watershed to remove at least 60 homes out of the regulatory floodplain, sharing project management, cost, and responsibilities..

Round Rock West

2015


The District released the new Flood Monitoring System interactive website. Flooding occurred on Memorial Weekend 2015, and Dam #22 sustained some damage.  Emergency assistance was provided by Williamson County to stabilize the dam.  FEMA awarded a grant to help with the cost for the emergency repairs.

FMS website

2016


Construction of Dam #7 Modernization begins and is anticipated to be completed in late 2017.  This project consists of reconstructing the auxiliary spillway as a labyrinth weir designed to meet TCEQ requirements.  Dam #8 Modernization design is underway.

Dam 7 construction site